Archive for the ‘Jobs’Category

A Recruiting Firm Partner As a Lifelong Ally

Never used a recruiter? The best executive recruiting firms have contacts in your industry at companies that you might not even realize are looking for someone like you. Many of these companies conceal their recruitment activities from competitors—just as you do not want to advertise that you are looking for a new position.

The reasons to establish a relationship with a recruiting firm partner who knows your industry are many and varied. Such a partner knows the employment marketplace better than you do and has the contacts necessary to move you forward in your job search.

The best recruiting and consulting firm partners have pedigree and experience as well as deep relationships in the discipline they serve, whether it is accounting, financial services, telecom, oil and gas, information technology, gaming, construction, legal, manufacturing, pharmaceutical, health care—you name it. These firms will know of the existence of emerging companies and their needs long before others in the industry. They know how to find such companies and match them with just the right C-level executive candidate.

The best candidates—and this is probably you—are well known to others within their industry and area. It is a sensitive issue for a company to approach a candidate about an executive level opportunity. High-level executive searches are often  kept confidential to prevent the loss of a company’s reputation and threat from competitors. An executive recruiting firm partner comes in very handy as an intermediary and can ascertain your interest before revealing your name to the organization, or their name to you.

As a star executive, you probably do not surf the job boards, but you should fully appreciate the extensive value of a partnership with a recruiting firm. Such firms have a winning strategy to help leading companies locate their next impact player. A high quality recruitment consultant knows his or her market niche intimately, and can give you excellent advice and help you negotiate a comprehensive compensation package.

Perhaps you are reading this because you are an HR professional who lacks the time to maintain the professional network that yields qualified candidates for various positions at your company. Senior level recruitment processes tend to be lengthy affairs. Whether you are an executive considering a new challenge or an HR professional in an emerging company seeking top talent, think of your trusted executive recruiter as a “Millionaire Matchmaker” and lifelong professional ally.

For more information on how executive recruitment play a part in securing your desired employment in the Raleigh and Research Triangle Park area, call (919) 719-6500 or e-mail our executive recruiter team:

Christiaan Heijmen, managing director for executive search

cheijmen@vaco.com

Dan Davies, managing director for executive search

ddavies@vaco.com

Bob Reuss, vice president of business development

breuss@vaco.com

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21

12 2011

Alternative Job Search

As many Americans still find themselves unemployed, people are getting creative with ways to go about finding the perfect job. As seen in the News and Observer, by creating his own website, Cris Cohen was able to draw attention to aspects of his professional experience that would not ordinarily be on his résumé, our own David Rhode, managing partner at Vaco, has a few thoughts for job seekers like Cohen.

Offbeat website reboots job search

BY DAVID RANII – Staff Writer

After Cris Cohen was laid off from his job as a contract worker for Cisco Systems in April, he decided a conventional job search just wasn’t going to cut it.

“The typical way of looking for a job has always been very frustrating, the whole thing that you have to present yourself in the format of a résumé, which is two pages and has all the excitement of insurance literature,” said Cohen, 40, of Cary.

So Cohen ventured down the unorthodox path of creating a website, “Cris Recruits A Company,” that provides a more engaging, more personalized showcase of his talents – including his writing skill.

“Hi. I’m Cris and I am looking for a company to join, one that needs people who can do more than just one job, people who can adapt,” Cohen states on the home page of crisrecruitsacompany.weebly.com. “Although I favor communications work, I am the employee equivalent of a Swiss army knife in that I have multiple skills and I look good in red.”

Indeed, Cohen’s varied work history is anything but résumé-friendly since it is, as Duke Ellington would have said, beyond category. As Cohen points out on his website, “I am experienced in communications, sales operations, project management, and certifications security enforcement (I swear I did not make that last job up).”

In case you’re wondering, certifications security enforcement work was what Cohen did as a contract worker at Cisco for the past four years. It turns out that there’s an active black market in Cisco certification exams, and Cohen, according to his website, was a project manager whose responsibilities included “creating tools, processes and programs for identifying illegal replication and distribution of Cisco testing and certification materials.”

Given the struggling economy and the high unemployment rate, job seekers across the country are trying new methods – video résumés, renting billboards – to stand out from the crowd.

It’s an extra tool

David Rhode, managing partner at Vaco Raleigh, an executive placement and consulting firm, said a website such as Cohen’s enables job seekers to call attention to pluses that might not make a résumé. In Cohen’s case, that includes the speaking engagements he has booked to promote a humor book that he plans to self-publish in September, “Staying Crazy to Keep From Going Insane.”

But, Rhode cautioned, it’s not a replacement for the traditional tools of job seekers: networking, applying for positions online and preparing a résumé.

“If you think you are going to build it and they will come, you are mistaken,” Rhode said.

Cohen agrees. He’s hoping the website will give his job search some extra oomph, but he’s using it as a supplement to a conventional job search. That includes, among many other things, “communicating with any and all family and friends” that he’s on a job hunt.

Rhode also stressed that anyone who takes this approach needs to “make sure it is done really well and really professionally” – a standard that, in his opinion, Cohen has met.

Issues such as misspelled words or haphazard organization, Rhode said, could turn what should be a “positive differentiator” into a negative one.

Finding a role model

Cohen was blindsided when his boss at Spherion Staffing Services, a company that provides contract workers nationwide, told him that he was being let go as part of a downsizing at Cisco. The day before Cohen had been given a new work assignment.

“It was one of those typical situations where you’re going 100 miles an hour and then suddenly somebody says you don’t have a job anymore,” Cohen said.

Cohen is a fan of a blog written by Seth Godin, a best-selling author and marketing guru, so he decided to ask him for advice on how to conduct a different kind of job search. Godin referred him to the “Susan Hires A Boss” website. It was created in 2009 by a protégé of Godin’s, Susan Villas Lewis, when she was seeking a job.

Cohen liked what he saw.

“My superpower is getting things done,” Lewis boasted on her website ( main.susan hiresaboss.com ). “I battle the agent of chaos. I overdeliver. I delight. I amaze. And I’m looking for a place in need of a super hero like me.”

Lewis said in a phone interview that she was contacted by 40 or so companies from across the country who saw her website, including a software development firm in Nashville, Tenn., that ultimately hired her for a marketing job. However, she had a not-so-secret weapon that Cohen doesn’t: Godin promoted her website on his blog ( seth godin.typepad.com ).

“That was a huge advantage,” she said.

Still looking

“Cris Recruits A Company” has been up for about six weeks and, so far, hasn’t produced any tangible results for Cohen. But he isn’t discouraged.

“I know times are difficult,” he said. “I like that it’s a proactive step. I like that I can update it and it’s not just ye old resume.”

When he communicates with a prospective employer, he makes sure to refer them to the website.

His hope is that executives will visit and say to themselves, “I like that he is doing something different.”

Photo Credit: Flickr User SOCIALisBETTER

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23

11 2011

The Effect of Charitable Activities on Your Employment

Many people do not realize how their charitable activities can play a part in securing their desired employment.  Although it only makes sense to volunteer for an organization that you hope to someday work for—such as a hospital—in order to get your foot in the door, there are reasons to volunteer your time and money to any number of nonprofits that may have nothing to do with your industry or choice of career.

Serving on nonprofit boards allows you to give back to your community and gain a certain prominence at the same time. Whether your specialty is accounting, marketing, computers or construction, you’ll be able to find a nonprofit that will welcome you with open arms. 

Being an active volunteer for nonprofits and charities affects your employment in the following positive ways:

  • Adds credibility to your resume and makes you appear well-rounded
  • Demonstrates that you have clout in the community
  • Shows who you are and what you care about
  • Opens doors to meeting other people, especially prestigious and powerful leaders 
  • Helps you win awards

People are attracted to others who display a social conscience, and that includes potential employers.  Many firms encourage their employees to be active on boards and to participate in charitable activities, because it reflects well on the company and builds public goodwill.

If you have ever wanted to volunteer for a cause, a nonprofit or a charitable organization, but are unsure which one or where to start, take a look at Charity Navigator, (http://www.charitynavigator.org/ ) a 501© (3) non-profit organization that provides information on more than 5,000 charities. One or two will probably attract you. Find one that means something to you.

For more information on how charitable activities can play a part in securing your desired employment in the Raleigh and Research Triangle Park area, call (919) 719-6500 or e-mail Crystal Suazo at csuazo@vaco.com.

Photo Credit: Flickr User HowardLake

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10

11 2011

Today’s Favored Techniques For Writing Resumes

Three Techniques For Writing Resumes

Like it or not, an employer will only glance at your resume for about 15 to 20 seconds, so knowing the purpose of your resume is extremely important.  The main purpose of your resume is to land an interview, and in turn hopefully that interview will land you a job.  The biggest mistake that job seekers make is to cater their resumes to getting the job and they forget about the interview process altogether.  Be careful that your resume doesn’t turn into a boring piece of work that makes you look desperate for a job.  

 A resume is designed to showcase your strengths as a professional.  It is important to backing up your qualities and strengths by connecting them with real life experiences that will provide evidence that you do actually know what you’re doing.  Here are some tips for making your resume as effective as possible.

Keywords

In the high tech world that we live in, a lot of resumes are stored on computers.  If your resume does not have certain keywords that might be specific to the companies wants or needs, you might be out of luck before they even get a chance to view your resume that you worked so hard to compose.  Before writing your resume, research the company and the description of the job and try to include keywords and language found in the job description.

Attention Grabbers     

Because an employer will spend less than a minute reviewing your resume, the title under which all of your information is listed really needs to grab your potential employer.  Be as expressive as possible so that your future boss can get a good idea about your past work experiences.

Bad Title:  Engineering

Good Title:  Hydraulics Engineer

Past Experiences

Every job that you’ve ever had in your entire life is probably not relevant to the job you might be applying for now.  Working in a bakery when you were 16 probably isn’t going to help you land an executive position.  Most experts agree that the past 20 years of your work experience are enough to determine if you are qualified for the job.  Also, don’t be afraid to list volunteer positions!  Even though you might not have been paid for work doesn’t mean that it isn’t applicable to the job you are applying for.  As long as it’s relevant, don’t leave it out!

Need help composing a resume?  Careerbuilder.com is a great source for creating and maintaining a resume.  We are also here to help you take your job search to the next level.  For more information, call (919) 719-6500 or e-mail Crystal Suazo at csuazo@vaco.com.

Photo Credit: Flickr User juhansonin

 

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29

09 2011

4 Mistakes To Avoid With an Interim Job Interview

An interim job is one you take with the knowledge that it will be temporary, often within a specified, brief time period, and sometimes with a specific task attached.  But just because it is temporary does not mean that an interim job will not have a long-term effect on your career.  And if you want that job, you must prepare yourself and take the interview process and the job itself very seriously.   

Avoid these four common mistakes as you prepare for an interim job interview:

Mistake No. 1:  Too Cavalier An Attitude

The job is important enough to your potential employer to take the time and money to staff it, so you must not adopt an attitude that is casual or indifferent toward the responsibilities of the position, especially if you are overqualified or believe the job is beneath you.  Instead show your earnestness and your strong desire not only to accomplish what the position demands, but also to excel at it.  In other words, be prepared to give 100 percent or more to ensure your success at this job, and be sure to let that attitude show in the interview.

 

Mistake No. 2:  Failure To Obtain the Complete Picture

This mistake has to do with communication and is quite common.  Often a company will hire an interim manager, for example, yet fail to inform the manager fully during the job interview exactly what the needs of the organization are and what they hope to accomplish.  This lack of complete communication only sets you up for ultimate failure, so be sure to ask plenty of questions during the interview process.  The more you understand about what the company’s objectives are, the better you will be able to perform.

 

Mistake No. 3:  Lack of Preparation

Do your research about the company interviewing you ahead of time and do not skimp on this step just because the job is temporary.  Insider knowledge is invaluable if you can get it by contacting and speaking with a business acquaintance or someone from your social media network who knows about the company in question.  Sometimes a company will hire an interim employee with unrealistic expectations about what that person can accomplish during the specified time period.  If you do your research and find out all the detail possible prior to the interview, you will know what questions to ask.  And if the expectations or timetables are unrealistic, be prepared to let the interviewer know why and exactly what you believe you can do for the potential employer, given the time and the situation.   It’s also important to consider the agency placing you on the job and their knowledge of the company, manager, and position you are interested in.

 

Mistake No. 4:  Not Giving the Interview Your Full Attention

You would be surprised at how many people make this mistake!  It almost goes without saying that you should not chew gum, nibble a sandwich, check emails, send a text or answer your cell phone during an interview, but people do. 

For more information on interim job opportunities in the Raleigh and Research Triangle Park area, call (919) 719-6500 or e-mail Crystal Suazo at csuazo@vaco.com.

Photo Credit: Flickr User buddawiggi

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01

09 2011

Obama Stresses Science and Technology as a Crucial Part of Economic Growth

President Barack Obama’s desire to create more jobs in an effort to boost economic growth has caused much talk in the technology-centered Triangle area. Science and technology sector job growth will play an important role in boosting national economic strength.

According to White House data, for every one job opening across the nation, there are four job-seekers. Science and technological jobs are the opposite. In fact, many science and tech businesses are finding it difficult to fill their open positions with high-skilled workers. Why is there such a low level of competition for these types of jobs?

Currently, only 14 percent of undergraduate students are studying science, technology, engineering or math.  Of that small percentage of students, nearly one-third will change their individual course of study over their college careers.

Why Can Technology Make a Greater Difference?

The president has recently credited competition from other countries for the increased need for a strong science and technology industry. China and India, two of the nations that value the skills and knowledge necessary to excel in these fields, are taking charge of the job market. They are taking jobs from the American people, and, in turn, are reaping the benefits of success. With a lack of interest in technological careers, the United States is falling behind in science-related fields that are crucial to our national success and international reputation.

By keeping these industries and jobs in America, our nation can continue to drive the global economy in an upward direction.

What You Can Do

As an individual looking for a job, already working in a steady position or working to excel in your career, there is no room for complacency.  To keep yourself competitive, you must work to improve yourself, your education and your professional standing.

By taking additional courses or attending industry-specific conferences and seminars, as a professional, you can not only improve your chances of getting a better job, but also help in growing the technology industry as a whole.

For more information on job opportunities in the tech industry in the Raleigh and Research Triangle Park area, call (919) 719-6500 or email Sid Mitchener at smitchener@vaco.com.

Photo Credit: Flickr User RMTip21

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17

08 2011

“Green” Jobs And The Power Industry

Many areas throughout the nation are experiencing a growth in the green job market, and the Triangle is no exception, but this increase in green power is also re-inventing the power industry as a whole. In an article seen in Today’s Engineer, our own Sid Mitchener, partner at Vaco, along with other professionals, discuss the changes that are occurring in an industry that is crucial to everyday life.

 

 

Career Focus: Power Engineering

By John R. Platt

 

Is power engineering a career in crisis, an industry on hold, or a field ripe for opportunity?

Yes to all three.

According to experts, the power engineering field is about to undergo a major 1-2-3 punch that will shake it up more than at any other point in its history:

  1. “Green” energy technologies — such as the smart grid, solar, wind, battery storage and other areas — are about to totally transform the business of energy generation, transmission and distribution.
  2. But at the same time, many — if not the majority — of the people currently working in power engineering are rapidly approaching retirement age and may soon leave the profession.
  3. Meanwhile, not nearly enough new engineers are entering the power engineering profession to meet the anticipated demand that will be seen in the next five to ten years.

These pending shifts will present numerous challenges, but may also create just as many opportunities for those willing to embrace them.

(Click here to read the entire article in Today’s Engineer)

Photo Credit: Blogspot User TheWhizzer

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04

08 2011

Vaco Offers Job Search Advice In N&O

As many Americans still find themselves unemployed, people are getting creative with ways to go about finding the perfect job. As seen in the News and Observer, by creating his own website, Cris Cohen was able to draw attention to aspects of his professional experience that would not ordinarily be on his résumé, our own David Rhode, managing partner at Vaco, has a few thoughts for job seekers like Cohen.

Offbeat website reboots job search

BY DAVID RANII – Staff Writer

After Cris Cohen was laid off from his job as a contract worker for Cisco Systems in April, he decided a conventional job search just wasn’t going to cut it.

“The typical way of looking for a job has always been very frustrating, the whole thing that you have to present yourself in the format of a résumé, which is two pages and has all the excitement of insurance literature,” said Cohen, 40, of Cary.

So Cohen ventured down the unorthodox path of creating a website, “Cris Recruits A Company,” that provides a more engaging, more personalized showcase of his talents – including his writing skill.

“Hi. I’m Cris and I am looking for a company to join, one that needs people who can do more than just one job, people who can adapt,” Cohen states on the home page of crisrecruitsacompany.weebly.com. “Although I favor communications work, I am the employee equivalent of a Swiss army knife in that I have multiple skills and I look good in red.”

Indeed, Cohen’s varied work history is anything but résumé-friendly since it is, as Duke Ellington would have said, beyond category. As Cohen points out on his website, “I am experienced in communications, sales operations, project management, and certifications security enforcement (I swear I did not make that last job up).”

In case you’re wondering, certifications security enforcement work was what Cohen did as a contract worker at Cisco for the past four years. It turns out that there’s an active black market in Cisco certification exams, and Cohen, according to his website, was a project manager whose responsibilities included “creating tools, processes and programs for identifying illegal replication and distribution of Cisco testing and certification materials.”

Given the struggling economy and the high unemployment rate, job seekers across the country are trying new methods – video résumés, renting billboards – to stand out from the crowd.

It’s an extra tool

David Rhode, managing partner at Vaco Raleigh, an executive placement and consulting firm, said a website such as Cohen’s enables job seekers to call attention to pluses that might not make a résumé. In Cohen’s case, that includes the speaking engagements he has booked to promote a humor book that he plans to self-publish in September, “Staying Crazy to Keep From Going Insane.”

But, Rhode cautioned, it’s not a replacement for the traditional tools of job seekers: networking, applying for positions online and preparing a résumé.

Read the full article here

photo credit: Flickr user MagneticNorth

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21

07 2011

Vaco Offers Tips To Triangle Job Candidates

Vaco Raleigh Partners David Rhode and Sid Mitchener were featured on NBC17′s My Carolina Today to discuss hiring trends in the Triangle and Research Triangle Park.

They also shared these tips:

New grads:

  1. Make sure you have a solid resume and it has been proofread by other people. 
  2. Leverage any assistance offered by your school.  Find out what alumni you can network with in the area.
  3. Network with friends who have recently found jobs, and target those companies. 
  4. Social Media – make sure your profiles on popular websites like Facebook, Twitter and Linked are professional.  Companies will do their research on you.
  5. Use social media sites to research companies and email hiring managers directly.
  6. Go to job fairs and networking events

 

 Experienced job searchers:

  1. Know what job websites are the best to use for their specific skill set and understand how to create job “alerts” on those sites.  A good example is www.indeed.com.
  2. Get involved with networking events, social media and industry specific user groups, and meet-up groups.
  3. Volunteer and give back to the community for a cause you are passionate about, and NETWORK!
  4. Don’t be afraid to ask for help.
  5. Use a recruiter you trust.

 

Vaco Raleigh is a leading firm in filling positions in select businesses with the right talent and making the process work for all involved. For more information, call (919) 719-6500 or email drhode@vaco.com or smitchener@vaco.com

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11

05 2011

Current Trends in Accounting and Finance Job Markets

David Rhode, managing partner of Vaco Raleigh

In the worlds of accounting and finance, job searching trends, the hiring process, employee-candidate relationships and the overall market are constantly changing. However, this is good news for both employers and potential candidates.  In a two-part series, David Rhode, managing partner of Vaco Raleigh, delivers a wealth of knowledge regarding how these changing trends in the finance industry benefit, and potentially hurt, the company hiring staff and the hopeful candidate. In a recent question-and-answer session, Rhode also offers advice and covers the latest job forecasts for positions in the accounting and finance fields in the Triangle area.

 

 

Part 1 of 2:

What Are Some Of The Current Trends in the Job Market?

So what are the current trends in the job market? Rhodes covers these trends and touches on the benefits of an ever-evolving job market and shifting employment trends from the perspectives of both an employer and a job candidate in the podcasts below:

Current Trends in the Job Market – Podcast

·        The Bottom Line:

o   Longer interview processes

o   Employers are becoming more selective

o   Background checks are more thorough

o   Increased competition for jobs

o   Better offers and rewards for better qualified candidates

Rhode’s Advice:

·        To the employer:

o   Shorten the interview process and keep them moving, because the longer the process, the greater the potential that a great candidate will migrate to other opportunities.

·        To the candidate:

o   Job competition is through the roof! Be prepared for meticulous background checks as well.  The best candidate is qualified, has a nice amount of experience and meets ALL of the employer’s employment criteria (not just most of them).

What are Some of the Employee Benefits of Using a Search Firm?

With all of the issues plaguing employers and today’s hiring process, using a search firm to find the best candidates can be a very wise option.  It helps weed out unqualified candidates earlier in the process, creates a more idealistic talent pool, and ultimately cuts down the time the hiring process takes all together. Rhodes covers all of these employer benefits and more in the podcast below:

Employee Benefits of Using a Search Firm – Podcast

·        The Bottom Line:

o   Search firms “weed out” unqualified candidates earlier in the process

o   Ensures that a candidate’s values, goals and objective  match those of hiring companies

o   Cut down the overall time required during the hiring process

o   Offers the most ideal candidate talent pools

o   Many great candidates, including high-level and “passively-looking” candidates, can only be found on their favorite search firm sites and otherwise will not apply to a job posting

o   Possibly the best investment in acquiring the best talent available and, as a result, increases the company’s value and effectiveness

Rhode’s Advice:

·        To the employer:

o   Consider using a search firm instead of, or in addition to, your traditional hiring process practices. Some of the best candidates and talent can only be found here, and you do not want to miss out if you want a great organization.

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15

04 2011